4 responses

  1. Linda Curtis
    April 25, 2020

    I agree with a lot of what you’re saying, but I don’t think I agree about thanking veterans for their service. A man at our bowling alley always wears a Vietnam War hat. I don’t know him well but I told him I remember how terrible that time was and how worried I was about my brothers being drafted. I thanked him for being brave enough to serve and he seemed truly touched. I think I’ll keep doing that because I know I’m being sincere. I do feel we all owe a debt of, at least, gratitude to the people who served/serve our country. Now you’ve made me want to binge on Curb Your Enthusiasm!

    Reply

    • The Dental Warrior
      April 25, 2020

      Hi Linda,

      My point is that the reflexive “thank you for your service” has become cliche. MOST people are doing it because social convention has dictated it. Society (our culture) is surely trying to compensate for the DISDAIN suffered by the Vietnam vets. Those guys got SCREWED by our society when they returned from deployment to the war zone.

      But, now… it’s being overdone, and it ABSOLUTELY is a matter of virtue-signaling by MOST. I’m not suggesting that you’re insincere. I believe you are being sincere. But, the Curb Your Enthusiasm scene illustrates my point by way of exaggeration.

      I’ve been thanked for my service by complete strangers when I wear my hat. I’ll tell you… it’s weird and awkward. These people would not say shit to me if they hadn’t seen my hat and felt compelled by societal pressure to do so. I wear the hat, because I like it. It’s a source of pride that I served on an aircraft carrier. The best part is that opens the door to meeting other Navy veterans, some who served on the same ship!

      But, I do not seek vacuous “thank yous.” I don’t need recognition. And, what do I say back? “You’re welcome?” LOL! It’s awkward. I usually end up saying “Thank you” back to them, which is an odd response, if you think about it.

      You may have seen in another recent blog post that I thanked a WW2 vet for his service by buying his lunch. He then invited me to sit with him and his wife. Now, THAT was cool!

      It was my honor to serve, and I’m proud of it. I don’t need (or want) to be thanked by strangers… or anyone else, for that matter. I know what I did. I don’t need recognition or endorsement by anyone else.

      My main point is that MOST of the time it’s CONTRIVED, and it has become trite and cliche. The same is true for this outpouring of virtue-signaling for the “health care heroes” and “essential workers.”

      It’s also a “FUCK YOU” to those of us who have been FORCED out of work, now unable to support our own families. Who’s making the REAL SACRIFICE here?!? They’ve been FORCED to make that sacrifice.

      The “essential” workers still have a job and can still support their families… doing the jobs they’ve ALWAYS done. Big fucking deal. Good for them. Maybe in the next crisis, they won’t be “essential,” eh?

      Be very careful about endorsing bigotry that creates a favored class and an UNDERCLASS of citizens under the guise of safety in a MANUFACTURED “crisis.” Benjamin Franklin said something about sacrificing essential Liberties in exchange for perceived “safety” and deserving neither.

      Reply

  2. Sherman House DDS
    April 25, 2020

    Agreed! Duty doesn’t require thanks!

    And also, get a haircut you hippy!

    Reply

    • The Dental Warrior
      April 25, 2020

      LOL! Hi Sherman! Yeah… tried to cover what’s left of my mop with a hat. But, yeah… no haircut in quite a while!

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top
mobile desktop